Carboy Winery is open for dine-in and takeout.

Winemaking Process

Three large silver wine tanks and wooden barrels in a Carboy Winery wine making facility.
A map of Colorado wine regions and the path to Carboy Winery.
Map of Colorado wine regions.

grand valley, co

200 miles west of Denver, in and around Grand Junction and Palisade lies the Grand Valley American Viticultural Area located in Mesa County, Colorado. With an average elevation of 4,700 feet above sea level, the high desert climate of the Grand Valley is home to some of the highest vineyards in North America.  

Encompassing around 76,000 acres, the terrain is varied, ranging from alluvial soils along the Colorado River to stony and loamy soils on the mesas. Due to the arid desert climate, the Grand Valley enjoys hot, sunny days with very cool nights, making for ideal fruit-growing conditions which produce wines of great depth and character. To learn more about the Grand Valley and other Colorado wine growing regions visit the link below.
LEARN MORE

WHITE WINE

Winemaking Process
Wine grapes on the stem.
1
CRUSH & DESTEM

Grapes are harvested when ripe and then transported to the winery. Then, they go directly into a destemmer.

Icon illustration of grapes being pressed in a wine press.
2
PRESS

After being destemmed, most white grapes go into a pneumatic press which squeezes juice from the grapes and separates it from the skins and seeds.

Icon illustration of a thermometer.
3
CHILL

Juice settles for a period in a chilled tank to remove suspended grape solids that would normally add harshness to the texture and flavor.

Icon illustration of grapes inside a liquid droplet.
4
YEAST

Yeast is added (or grows naturally in a “native” ferment) and it eats grape sugars to make alochol and CO2.

Icon illustration of a wine keg.
5
STIRRING THE LEES

White wines made in barrels receive more oxygen. The winemaker stirs them frequently to agitate the yeast bits (”lees”) adding more texture.

Icon illustration of three wine kegs stacked on each other.
6
FERMENTER

White wines made in stainless steel or concrete are kept at lower temperatures to preserve delicate floral aromas and zippy acidity.

Icon illustration of a wine keg with a tap on it.
7
FILTER

Filtering removes any microbes and sediments to make wines clear, although not all white wines get filtered.

Icon illustration of three bottles of wine.
8
BOTTLING

Bottling occurs with minimal exposure to oxygen.

Icon illustration of wine being poured into a glass.
9
ENJOY!

After bottling, most white wines go directly to market!

RED WINE

Winemaking Process
Illustration of a building between tress in a valley.
1
HARVEST

The grapes are picked when ripe and then delivered to the winery. Some are harvested by hand and others by machines.

Icon illustration of grapes in a harvest basket.
2
SORT

In many fine wines, grape bunches are sorted by hand to remove leaves and unripe berries.

Wine grapes on the stem.
3
DESTEM

Then, bunches go into the destemmer. Some winemakers choose not to destem and ferment whole clusters.

Icon illustration of grapes inside a liquid droplet.
4
YEAST

Yeasts eat grape sugars and make alcohol and CO2. Red wines ferment for about 14 days-with some taking as long as 50 or more days.

Icon illustration of grapes being pressed in a wine press.
5
FREE-RUN WINE

When the fermentation completes, free-run wine is removed and leftover skins are pressed.

Icon illustration of nine wine kegs stacked on each other.
6
REST

Wines rest-”elevage.” Acidity softens as sharp music acid turns to smooth lactic acid by a helpful microbe called Oenococcus oeni.

Icon illustration of a wine keg with a tap on it.
7
FILTER

Filtering clarifies wines by removing microbes and sediments. Not all wines are filtered.

Icon illustration of three bottles of wine.
8
BOTTLING

Bottling occurs with minimal exposure to oxygen.

Icon illustration of wine being poured into a glass.
9
ENJoY!

Some wines continue to age in bottle for years until release.

Visit one of our Colorado winery locations today!
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